The Ultimate Guide To Real Estate Teams

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The Ultimate Guide to Real Estate Teams

Introduction:
So You're Maxed out?

Solo real estate entrepreneurs are a unique breed. These “lone wolf” agents put an immense amount of work into a single transaction, from communicating with leads and earning their trust, to listing and showing a home, to negotiating the deal, to drawing up contracts, to completing the sale and collecting the commission. The best solo entrepreneurs handle all of this with passion and hard work, which can translate into a successful and rewarding career.

However, being a solo real estate entrepreneur has its limits—there are only so many hours you can work in a week, and only so many clients and transactions you can handle in a year. The preferable solution, chosen by many agents, is to form their own real estate teams. This concept has picked up steam over the last decade or so: A team leader brings on listing agents, buyer’s agents, marketing specialists, and other assistants to help run a brand-new business.

Being a solo real estate entrepreneur has its limits—there are only so many hours you can work in a week, and only so many clients and transactions you can handle in a year. The preferable solution, chosen by many agents, is to form their own real estate teams.”

The advantages agents seek from the team model are plentiful. A survey from Inman Group that allowed respondents to pick more than one answer found that 61 percent of respondents cited “work-life balance” as a reason to form a team, 56 percent (respondents could pick more than one answer) cited “the chance to expand their business opportunities,” and 50 percent cited “providing more effective representation for clients.” These benefits are alluring, but building a successful team requires more than hiring a few people and turning them loose to work. The process requires careful planning of goals, the structure of your team, and the roles and responsibilities taken by your team members.

This guide details the team-building process for agents who are interested in starting their own teams, as well as agents looking to revamp or expand their existing teams. It focuses on the importance of good planning, provides sample frameworks that teams of various sizes might take, details several defined roles your team may include, and explains how a team-centric brokerage can help you achieve success.

The Value of Teams

Teams offer a great benefit to your career, the associates you work with, and the clients and community you serve. The monetary benefits are obvious, but for successful solo real estate entrepreneurs who feel overwhelmed, the time savings are also significant. Team members share in your success and expertise, which ultimately helps the overall industry. And if you are good at your job of helping people sell homes and move into new ones, your additional success will translate into more happy customers. What follows are seven ways teams bring value to a real estate business.

Forming a team allows agents to return to or strengthen focus on what’s important to them within their careers.”

MORE REVENUE/EARNING POTENTIAL

Successful lone wolf real estate agents may encounter an unusual paradox holding back their careers: their own success. The more sales you make, the greater your reputation grows, the more potential clients come your way—this cycle of success ultimately can lead to turning away clients because your plate is too full. Subsequently, your revenue tops out simply because you are maxed out on what you have the time and resources to do. Developing a team allows you to delegate tasks to assistants and coworkers, thus allowing you take on those extra leads, build stronger client relationships, and increase your earning potential.

BETTER WORK-LIFE BALANCE

Along the same lines, a hyper-successful solo real estate entrepreneur who is rolling in leads and clients may not have much time for anything else. What’s the point of working so hard if you can’t find time to enjoy the rewards of that work with your family and friends? Starting a real estate team lets agents handle an increased number of clients and transactions while still maintaining a healthy work-life balance.

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FOCUSING ON WHAT’S IMPORTANT TO YOUR CAREER

Every real estate agent comes to the business with specific goals—goals that can evolve over time. As these agents enjoy more success, those goals can get away from them. Gradually, they lose the work-life balance they were seeking, work less with their target clientele (e.g., young families or more local buyers and sellers), get bogged down with busywork, and so on. Forming a team allows agents to return to or strengthen focus on what’s important to them within their careers.

LATITUDE

An advantage of leading a team is that you (theoretically) enjoy wide latitude to run your business in the way you want. Yet, when the transactions pile up, agents might find themselves throwing that latitude out the window just to stay successful. A team allows you to stick to your principles (and partner with people who will embrace your business plan), while giving you the leverage to maintain and increase your success.

SCALABILITY

As already stated, success breeds success, but one person can only do so much with the hours in a week. Inevitably, you will hit a point where you simply can’t grow anymore. By forming a team, your business can continue to scale. The great thing about this concept is that the sky really is the limit—if the resources and clientele are there, you can continue to add people and expand your business as you see fit.

EXPENSE REDUCTION PER TRANSACTION

Hiring help to reduce transaction costs may seem odd, because the expense of paying your team—particularly a transaction coordinator—will always be there. But think about how much time it takes you to complete a transaction, from drawing up the contract to staying in contact with all of the necessary third parties, to concluding the process. These tasks likely consume hours of your time and take energy away from more impactful responsibilities, such as communicating with clients. A transaction coordinator and other team members can do these tasks more efficiently, thus saving money, setting the stage for more business growth, and allowing you to focus on what you do best.

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INCREASED PRODUCTIVITY

The ultimate goal for a real estate team is to increase output and revenue. When many team members work in concert to get houses sold, the amount of transactions will proportionally increase. Imagine a sandwich shop and the way a production line of workers can get your sandwich made in a minute, whereas a single person may need five minutes to deliver your food. Both sandwiches might be delicious, but that production line shop can serve more customers who will leave happy. A real estate team works the same way—each person works individually yet together to achieve goals, increase productivity, and impress clients. The benefits of forming your own real estate team are real. Although relinquishing some responsibilities might be a struggle at first, the long-term advantages will soon make you feel less worried about trusting someone else to handle the minor details of each transaction.

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Five Signs That It's Time to Scale

How do you know if your business is ready for a team structure? These are some signs that the timing is right—or isn’t right—for top-producing solo agents to take the plunge and start their own real estate teams.

If you are constantly on the phone, talking with leads and customers, and falling behind on the technical details of listing a home and completing the transaction, the timing might be right for a team.””

The advantages agents seek from the team model are plentiful. A survey from Inman Group that allowed respondents to pick more than one answer found that 61 percent of respondents cited “work-life balance” as a reason to form a team, 56 percent (respondents could pick more than one answer) cited “the chance to expand their business opportunities,” and 50 percent cited “providing more effective representation for clients.” These benefits are alluring, but building a successful team requires more than hiring a few people and turning them loose to work. The process requires careful planning of goals, the structure of your team, and the roles and responsibilities taken by your team members.

This guide details the team-building process for agents who are interested in starting their own teams, as well as agents looking to revamp or expand their existing teams. It focuses on the importance of good planning, provides sample frameworks that teams of various sizes might take, details several defined roles your team may include, and explains how a team-centric brokerage can help you achieve success.

  • You currently complete about 40 transactions per year. There’s no magic number of transactions you must have to be ready for a team; much depends on the agent, the market, and the economy. However, 40 is a good general benchmark—that’s nearly one per week, which is on the cusp of the volume that a single agent can handle solo.
  • You have enough volume to bring on more people. The number of transactions isn’t the only consideration for starting a team; the volume of leads coming your way should be factored into your decision, as well as the amount of commission you are earning. After all, part of your commissions will pay for your future staff, and though that will eventually lead to more commissions, in the short term, you also need to be making enough to pay yourself.
  • You need help with operations. If you are constantly on the phone, talking with leads and customers and falling behind on the technical details of listing homes and completing transactions, the timing might be right for a team.

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  • You need help with marketing and gathering new leads. Alternately, if you are constantly bogged down with busywork and can’t find time to market yourself or initiate contact with new leads, a team might be your best option for refocusing your mission.
  • You are ready to let go. As already stated, self-made successes can find it difficult to give up some of the control they have worked so hard to establish. With the help of a team, the trade-off is is fewer 60-hour weeks and more commissions, but you need to be ready to let go a little bit. Jumping back into some of the tasks you’ve tabbed for skilled people to perform will defeat the purpose of starting and leading a team.

Once you know the timing is right, you can move on to more serious planning.

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First, a Business Plan

Before forming a new team or adjusting and possibly expanding a current one, you will need to formulate a plan. On your own, managing everything you need to do and reacting to what comes next may be a lot of work, but it may not be that complex—you simply know what to do and do it. With a team, you will be directing and trusting others to deliver on their parts of every lead follow-up, listing, open house, and transaction. They need guidance and oversight. In the aforementioned Inman survey on teams, 84 percent of respondents felt that having a clear vision for the team was important. In short, your team needs your leadership, but that will be difficult without a plan everyone can follow.

WHY IS A BUSINESS PLAN IMPORTANT TO YOUR TEAM?

A business plan is a critical part of developing a successful team, but before looking at the positives, let’s first take a look at why not having a plan is so dangerous. Most real estate agents aren’t particularly great planners. This isn’t necessarily a flaw, but more the nature of the business—real estate professionals are high-eyed people who make gut decisions and then go. Although this serves them well in some cases, it can spell disaster within a team concept. Team leaders may think, “I’ll just hire a few people to help,” and never consider the finer details, such as roles, compensation, and organizational structure. Without being intentional in your planning, chaos can ensue, as your team members may disengage, and then revenue suffers.

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The end results of this chaos aren’t pretty: lost business, lost profits, and lost reputation. Team leaders may either abandon the team or muddle through with the improperly planned team, often coming away with less revenue than when they were on their own.

However, it doesn’t have to be this way. Defining roles, setting goals, and forecasting growth will provide the blueprint to succeed. You already know what hard work means—just a little bit more of it, instead of choices made from your gut, can set you on the path toward building a productive team that works in sync with itself and reaches marketing and revenue goals.

TEAM CULTURE AND HAPPINESS

Team culture defines not only your team’s business environment, but also the way team members commit to your mission, work together, and attend to the finer details that lead to excellence. Unhappy team members don’t buy into the team culture and are usually not as productive as they could be. You set the tone and mission of the team’s business; with good planning, every decision will be made with that team culture in mind. Ultimately, you’ll want to partner with people who buy into the culture, thus better ensuring they will be happy as the successes build up.

TEAM EXPECTATIONS

A lack of set expectations can hurt teams as thoroughly as other planning-related deficiencies. What are your team’s goals? Which responsibilities are entrusted to each team member? How are team members held accountable? How are they recognized and rewarded for exceptional work? What do you expect of yourself as team leader? Expectations in these and other areas must be established in order to gauge success and move the business forward.

Team culture defines not only your team’s business environment, but also the way team members commit to your mission, work together, and attend to the finer details that lead to excellence.”

GROWTH OF THE BUSINESS

New teams may not be looking to expand beyond a few people, but growth will be required to get these businesses to reach their desired output. If you want to grow a bigger team, long-term planning for bringing on new team members and determining the rate of expansion is essential. Existing teams need the same kind of forecasting: What adjustments are needed now to lead the team to the place you want to be in the next year, or the year after, or five years down the line? Solo real estate entrepreneurs often live in the moment, advancing from one transaction to the next and collecting their commissions. Once you become a team leader, you must lead the team—and that’s impossible if you don’t know where you are going.

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Unshakeable Infrastructure

The way you structure your team will be as important as those you structure it with. This is your team; with a solid plan and a brokerage that offers outstanding support while allowing you to maintain control of your operation, all of the moving parts can neatly fall into place according to your specifications. However, for that to occur, you need to map out an infrastructure based on the size of your team and the goals you have for the business. Keep these seven considerations in mind when structuring your team.

Your infrastructure—especially if you are tweaking an existing team—may also depend on the skill sets of your existing team members.”

REGULATIONS

The regulations and laws regarding real estate transactions, licensing, and agents are formidable—and unfortunately, rules vary by state. Even standard guidelines are complex and must be considered for the infrastructure you are implementing or expanding. For example, which licenses must your team members hold so they can effectively perform their duties? Regulations shouldn’t be a deterrent against starting a team, but they must be considered as you develop and maintain a team.

PICKING AN INFRASTRUCTURE

The team infrastructure you choose often depends on what goals you have for your business, your coworkers, and the revenue you hope to achieve. A startup team may include a few team members, enough to set your venture in motion and leave the door open for growth and scalability. Established teams looking to revamp or expand their operations may need more support staff. Your infrastructure—especially if you are tweaking an existing team—may also depend on the skill sets of your existing team members. What’s important is that you map out your team, hire or train to fill gaps, and think about how your team might grow beyond the infrastructure you choose.

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STRIVING FOR SUCCESS: AVOID CHURN

Team frameworks that highlight you and your team members’ strengths, define roles, and keep everyone happy are primed to be successful. Team members feel fulfilled knowing their efforts are appreciated and that they contribute to reaching overall goals. A lack of a framework often results in employee churn—unhappy team members who leave for other jobs. Replacing team members is expensive: their departure leaves a work gap, hiring someone new takes time and money, and any training and mentoring you have invested in the former coworker flies out the door with them. Although some churn is inevitable (after all, few people stay at a one job forever), your infrastructure, or lack thereof, shouldn’t be the reason why team members want to leave.

UNDERSTAND WHAT YOU’VE CREATED

A challenge for existing teams is to identify the gaps in their frameworks and and adjust processes or hire to fill those gaps. Just bringing on a few extra members doesn’t automatically lead to smooth sailing; you can still find yourself in constant crisis mode, putting out fire after fire, which can deflate even the most enthusiastic teams. Honestly assess what can be done better and what needs to be added. Team-centric brokerages are a great resource for helping with this assessment; these partners can recommend frameworks and strategies to form a team that clicks.

Just bringing on a few extra members doesn’t automatically lead to smooth sailing; you can still find yourself in constant crisis mode, putting out fire after fire, which can deflate even the most enthusiastic teams.”

TAKE ADVANTAGE OF TECHNOLOGY

The life of a successful lone wolf real estate agent is a juggling act—you are constantly trying to keep all those butcher knives (we’ll assume you are that daring!) in the air. Teams relieve this constant state of frenetic activity, but many moving parts remain that a team leader may overlook. Technology can not only settle down your life, but also increase productivity and save money. For example, the software offered by top-flight brokerages might include marketing tools, transaction management resources, paperwork review tools, and more—all part of the package when working with the broker. An Inman survey on teams found that over 80 percent of respondents believe technology assists teams in the way they work. Combined with an outstanding team, technology can improve every aspect of your business and give your team members the resources to deliver excellent work.

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TEAM AGREEMENTS

The real estate team concept stresses collaboration and collegiality, but you must remember that it is still a business—and any thriving business operates within a framework of guidelines, policies, and procedures. Therefore, establishing clear agreements on the way your team operates, the roles and responsibilities team members will follow, and the amount every member is compensated is essential for efficiency and compliance. These team agreements should include:

  • Team titles, definitions, and responsibilities
  • Licensing policies
  • Disclosure requirements
  • Compensation structures and commission splits
  • Recruiting policies
  • Separation procedures
  • Confidentiality policies
  • Referral fees

Moving these steps out in front will help to avoid any confusion or hard feelings that could get in the way of your team’s successful operation. A team-centric brokerage will help provide guidance on these agreements and consult with you along the way so that you are leaving no stone unturned.

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Setting Roles and Responsibilities

This is a scenario we’ve seen with new, inadequately defined teams. A team leader handles the team listing presentation and crushes it, thus landing the client. This leader hands off the account to the team, assuming someone else will run with it. However, no roles were defined on this team, and no plan is in place detailing who should do what next. Needless to say, the transaction is off to a bad start.

Even with a small, solid team, verbal agreements about roles are often inadequate to prevent confusion. As your team grows, you won’t be able to keep tabs on everything and must trust that your team is stepping up and functioning as defined.

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WHY DEFINED ROLES MATTER

As real estate agents know, things can go wrong in any or many parts of the transaction. If you’re lucky, a mistake will only delay the sale and maybe reduce your net profit from the deal. The worst-case scenario is that you will lose the transaction, and all of the time, money, and resources spent on it will go to waste. Defined roles ensure that the people best suited for various tasks are completing those tasks with accuracy, timeliness, and skill. The team leader oversees all of these moving parts en route to a successful transaction. Defined roles also help in these ways:

  • Overcoming Deadline Pressures If one person must handle everything involved in a transaction, that person is either putting in long hours or is at risk of missing key deadlines. Team members focused on fewer duties can manage time better and ensure their piece of the puzzle meets established quality requirements and deadlines.
  • Improving Accuracy Again, it can be overwhelming for one person to juggle too many tasks—and the chance of error increases. Defined team roles allow everyone to focus on their jobs and only their jobs, confident that their coworkers are doing the same.
  • Ensuring Compliance Transaction regulations and procedures vary from state to state and municipality to municipality. Someone specializing in compliance (and that could be the brokerage instead of a team member) should keep the transaction on track.

Defined roles ensure that the people best suited for various tasks are completing those tasks with accuracy, timeliness, and skill.

  • Following Up with Leads As the leads pour in, defining who follows up is essential for turning them into clients. Inconsistent calls from more than one team member can turn off leads; no contact at all will obviously hurt your chances of converting leads even more. A similar strategy applies with past clients—who will keep in touch with these former customers in the hope that they will return to you the next time they are selling a home?
  • Outlining Handoff Among Roles Many transaction tasks rely on a previous task in order to be completed. With defined roles and processes, the handoff among these tasks and among team members is smoother, bringing the transaction (and commission) closer to completion with each step.
  • Keeping Team Members Accountable With various responsibilities delegated to the appropriate team members, if something does break down, you know exactly where the problem occurred. Moreover, this accountability keeps everyone on their toes, knowing the team’s overall success depends on their individual successes.

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ORG CHARTS

Creating clear team organizational charts is the best way to see what roles are played by the members of your team, who reports to whom (with you at the top of the chart, of course), and where there is room to grow. Here are some sample real estate team org charts for teams of various sizes, with recommended roles included in the frameworks.

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A VARIETY OF ROLES

As real estate teams grow, the variety of roles your team members hold will grow as well. We previously offered examples of org charts that teams of different sizes might use. What follows are more details, as suggested by industry consultant Travis Robertson, for four common roles on real estate teams.

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Assistant - An assistant does just that: assists the team lead (and in bigger teams, possibly buyers and listing agents) in any way possible.

Responsibilities might include:

  • Marketing activities
  • Lead generation tasks
  • Agent support activities
  • Customer care
  • General office duties

Assistants may be compensated by:

  • An hourly rate that will vary based on location
  • A small per-transaction bonus that keeps assistants focused on going above and beyond their expected responsibilities

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Transaction Coordinator - Transaction coordinators are a big help for the end of the selling process, stepping in for much of the busywork that solo agents previously slogged through on their own to finish the deal.

Responsibilities might include:

  • Managing all transactions from the moment they are under contract to conclusion
  • Communicating with, coordinating, and managing all third parties during the contract-to-close phase
  • Creating and maintaining appropriate systems and processes for the contract-to-close phase

Transaction coordinators may be compensated by:

  • A rate per transaction (most common), typically in the $199-$599 range
  • Base plus commission, usually seen in larger teams because ofthe fixed-income guarantee

As real estate teams grow, the variety of roles your team members hold will grow as well”

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Buyer’s Agent - A buyer’s agent is often the first person a real estate agent brings aboard when developing a team. The buyer’s agent takes leads generated by the team leader, helps with showing properties and following up with interested buyers, and moves the relationship with potential buyers to a place where the team leader steps back in to seal the deal. Also buyer’s agents might be involved in some minor lead generation.

Responsibilities might include:

  • Substantial lead follow-up
  • Showing properties
  • Previewing properties
  • Developing and maintaining neighborhood expert status
  • Following and maintaining appropriate systems
  • Attending regular training events
  • Presenting offers
  • Writing contracts (may vary by team)
  • Hosting open houses (may vary by team)

Buyer’s Agent may be compensated by:

  • Percentage of net commissions (after broker split and/or other fees)
  • Experts recommend that buyer’s agents should never get more than 50 percent of commission
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Listing Specialist - A listing specialist, also known as a listing agent, takes over some responsibilities from the team leader in getting a property to market.

Responsibilities might include:

  • Minor lead generation; major lead follow-up
  • Negotiating deals Previewing properties
  • Developing and maintaining neighborhood expert status
  • Following and maintaining systems
  • Attending regular training events
  • Presenting offers
  • Writing contracts (may vary by team)
  • Hosting open houses (may vary by team)

Buyer’s Agent may be compensated by:

  • Percentage of net commissions (after broker split and/or other fees)
  • Base plus commission (in this case, usually about 10 percent of net commissions)

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ROLE PARAMETERS

With roles defined, you can set specific parameters for each team member. Although this seems like a no-brainer, it’s surprisingly easy for teams to fall into the trap of everyone saying, “I didn’t know that was my responsibility.” Parameters clearly spell out who is doing what and when. This keeps your team’s processes humming along, from the first contact with a lead, to open houses, to negotiations, and then to closing. This also helps prevent you from trying to handle everything, because sometimes team leaders can’t help but overreach into tasks they once handled on their own. With a team, you can (and should) trust that everyone will step up to do their part.

EVALUATIONS

As with any business team, setting expectations and evaluating member performance helps determine if goals are being accomplished and team members are reaching their full potential. A weak link may slow down your team’s processes, so periodic evaluations that identify employee strengths and weaknesses can give them a blueprint to improve. Evaluations also help determine if compensation should be adjusted upward for your top-performing team members.

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The Measures of a Successful Team

Likely, you have enjoyed success on your own. Measuring team success requires a somewhat different approach, not only because you are gauging results based on an increased number of transactions, but also because you are charting the performance and skills of the members of your team. With that in mind, here are six measures of team success to consider as your business grows.

Training is a powerful perk to attract and maintain talent—your team members won’t be looking for development opportunities elsewhere if they know they will have the chance to expand their skills and roles with your team.

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ONGOING TRAINING

Hiring skilled team members is essential to the success of your team, but even if you find those workers, they can still improve and enhance their skills. For instance, they can provide ongoing training leads to better teams that are more knowledgeable, versatile, and efficient. Vacations (including your own) won’t be so daunting because, for example, an assistant with open house experience can fill in when a buyer’s agent is out of town for the weekend.

Furthermore, training is a powerful perk to attract and maintain talent—your team members won’t be looking for development opportunities elsewhere if they know they will have the chance to expand their skills and roles with your team. Training is one area in which a proactive brokerage partner can be a big help. A comprehensive broker can deliver training so that you keep your focus where it belongs: running a successful real estate business.

DEVELOPING AGENTS

In a perfect world, you build an outstanding team that stays with you for 20 years or more, right until your retirement. This dream is nice, but realistically, some of your team members—especially buyer’s agents and listing specialists—will want to strike out on their own. Many team leaders see this as an opportunity to train and mentor the next generation of real estate agents and teams. Your proteges’ success ultimately is a mark of your success, and the relationships you’ve established can stay strong and benefit all parties—as well as the local real estate industry—for years to come.

STAYING CURRENT WITH INDUSTRY TRENDS

Just as you must update your tactics to reflect new regulations and the state of the market and industry, so must your team. Part of this goes back to providing training, but part of it also means keeping up or even surging ahead of the competition, rather than trying to catch up to it. For example, think back to dawn of the internet age; the first real estate agents to put listings online were far ahead of the curve when the web exploded in popularity. Encourage your team members to keep up with general real estate trends and anything that is new in their specific area of expertise, and take time periodically (say, once a month) to discuss their findings.

Just as you must update your tactics to reflect new regulations and the state of the market and industry, so must your team. Part of this goes back to providing training, but part of it also means keeping up or even surging ahead of the competition, rather than trying to catch up to it.”

PROFITABILITY

This may be the easiest measure of the success of your team—after all expenses are met, after all your support staff is paid, and after each transaction is completed, it is the amount of revenue that ends up in your pocket. Profitability is why it’s so important to determine if you are ready for a team. It’s also a measure of how you want your business to grow: If you know how much net revenue you want to bring in, you can structure and expand your team accordingly.

A transaction fee-based model offered by the best team-centric brokerages provides stability and flexibility when charting revenue. This approach forgoes the varying, commission-based fees for a flat charge per transaction. Teams keep more of their commissions, thus leading to greater profitability with each deal. Moreover, team leaders can negotiate better compensation splits with their team members because they aren’t haggling splits with their brokerages. With this complexity out of the way, bonus structures for agents can be more easily established.

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MEETING OBJECTIVES

Your business plan should include objectives and benchmarks by which personal and team success can be measured. When you decided to start the team, likely you were at a set number of transactions per year and were ready to expand in order to take on more. Did you reach that new number? Did you achieve your revenue projections? Are more leads being accepted or at least, adequately pursued and followed up with? Periodically assess if benchmarks are being met, and if they aren’t, adjust your team roles and processes to get back on track.

GROWING THE BUSINESS

Once a team becomes successful, leaders see the potential of growing it even more—potentially handling more transactions, adding more team members, and netting more profits. Don’t grow your team too quickly, or you’ll have more team members than revenue to pay them. But when the time is right and you are comfortable with having a bigger team (some team leaders want to stay small, which can still be rewarding and profitable), expanding your business is a reasonable and exciting goal. Perhaps you want to go national with your team or be one of the major real estate players in your local market. With a solid team structure in place—and again, a quality brokerage behind the scenes is a big help—the scalability is already there. You just need to determine when you want to take that next step.

Profitability is why it’s so important to determine if you are ready for a team. It’s also a measure of how you want your business to grow: If you know how much net revenue you want to bring in, you can structure and expand your team accordingly.

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Conclusion: A Business That You're Proud Of

Real estate agents looking for ways to start a team face a unique set of worthwhile challenges to getting their budding businesses off the ground. Revamping established teams that aren’t meeting expectations is even more challenging. Through good timing, comprehensive planning, a solid infrastructure, defined roles, and proactive goal setting, teams and their skilled people can find success and build a business they can be proud of. Another important facet of high-performing teams is the brokerage they trust to provide guidance, accelerate business, deliver game-changing technology, and heighten brand recognition. HomeSmart is that partner that understands and supports teams like no other brokerage in the industry.

Through good timing, comprehensive planning, a solid infrastructure, defined roles, and proactive goal setting, teams and their skilled people can find success and build a business they can be proud of.”

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